Archives for posts with tag: graphic design

‘Almost Flat’ design is officially all the rage. But how close to flat do your UI elements have to stay to be considered ‘Almost Flat’?

About 2-8% away from flat.

I’m not going to go into the benefits of Almost Flat, but rather show my preferred method to creating almost flat assets.

Start with a flat shape of your desired color and create a duplicate shape on top. Set the duplicate shape color to white, the blend mode to multiply, and then add a gradient overlay in the blend options. Adjust the opacity to between 2 and 8 percent, and voila! Behold your gorgeous subtle gradient.

Almost-Flat-PS

Another element that can be included is a subtle shadow. Shadows are used to reduce confusion when you have overlapping elements or want to create an ever-so-subtle ‘pop’ on a specific element.

Remember, it’s an ‘Almost’ shadow. Turn that opacity way down, try %20 to start. Check out the difference in shadow blur: with 2px offset, no blur produces a sharp look and a 6px blur adds subtle depth to your design.

Possible Shadows on Almost Flat Buttons

Boom shakalaka. That flat shape is now ‘Almost Flat’. Pat yourself on the back for joining the movement.

Download the PSD used in these screenshots here!

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter, Dribbble & Hunie!

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The most fun a designer can have in their early careers is working at a bootstrapped tech startup.

It’s really a blast building a product from the ground up. As the company’s sole designer, it’s your responsibility to make sure what you ship is beautiful and intuitive. But when you’re the only artsy kid in the room, things can get tough. Here’s some hard-learned tips that have kept me going through the ups and downs.

Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop, Don’t Stop.

If you work at a startup, don’t let me catch you at the coffee shop without your moleskine. A doodle a day keeps creative block at bay. Keep pushing, iterating, and thinking of how to do it better.

Stuck? Ask for feedback from your coworkers. Hit print, make four copies: one for yourself, two for sharing with coworkers to take notes on, and one for the final decisions after you’ve synthesized the results.

Once you’re done with paper, pencil, and photoshop mock-ups, it’s time to prototype, get feedback, iterate, and repeat. Don’t ever stop. If your product is still under development, everything can change completely at any moment. Being able to throw your designs away and start over is essential to your success.

Go Outside Your Comfort Zone.

Learn a new thing or two, balance your visual design with interaction design. Codecademy and Code School are great places to learn some javascript and jQuery. If that’s over your head, Jessica Hiche’s Don’t Fear the Internet is an amazing resource to learn some HTML and CSS basics. Need a text editor? Go with Sublime Text. If your pixel polishing is lacking spend some time on Dribbble and Behance. Whatever you do, don’t get trapped in your own little design bubble—push your own limits and you’ll be amazed at how quickly your skills improve! Which leads us to…

Challenge Yourself When Others Don’t.

The hardest part is that your decisions will never be challenged enough. There’s no senior designer or creative director who will throw away your designs and tell you to start from scratch.

Sometimes, the team will be enamored with your very first version of a design. Don’t let it go to your head—you’re not done just yet. The only person who is able to really keep refining the design is you. And you need to. If you don’t, mediocrity will result. Great design doesn’t happen on accident. It doesn’t happen on the first try, either.

iterate

When you’re pushing a design, wherever you stop—that’s what the product will look like. Sometimes feedback from your non-designer coworkers is not enough. This is why user feedback is so important. There’s no better way to tell if your designs work or not then to test them on real people.

Some days, the juices are flowing, the team is mind-melding, and everything falls into place. Engineers are executing perfectly, and you feel a sense of wonder at how much your team can accomplish in just one day.

Some days, there’s simply no wind in the sails. Go for a walk, pour yourself a cup of coffee, and draw it up again from scratch.

Startup Life isn’t easy, but it’s definitely worth it.

—Will

Don’t forget to follow me on Twitter, and on Dribbble too!

What do you think? How do you go about being the sole designer at your company?

So you wanna learn some web skills? Think you got what it takes? Good, because all it REALLY takes is patience, and practice. Let’s get started.

Be Social. Use Social Media or fall behind.

This is really step 0.5. If you aren’t following the experts in your field, start there. By following designers, developers, firms, and organizations, you can stay on the cutting edge of what’s happening, what’s hated, what’s hot… basically what the movers and shakers of the web world are up to.

Here’s a list to follow to get you started. (mostly resources, downloads, articles)

Here’s a list of Behance’s “creatives to watch.” (mostly designers’ personal twitters)

Use Resources. Don’t re-invent the wheel if you don’t have to.

There are hundreds of thousands of free, open-source resources available on the internet for you to download, learn from, and make your own. Google is a good first bet for any web-design question, but after a while you get the hang of where to look. For starters, bookmark the following tools/resources I use on the regular:

Keep Learning. Weather you’re gaining knowledge or practicing skills, keep leveling up. Resting on your laurels is a wicked bad mistake, yo.

Read blogs for breakfast, and image galleries for dessert. Knowledge is power. Keep your mind sharp and your subconscious swimming with beautiful and original work.

News & Opinions:

Typography & Art:

UI/Web/App Inspiration:

Stay Passionate. Believe in yourself & be a rockstar.

It can be intimidating, especially when you’re aware of the vast amount of knowledge and skill you don’t possess. But if you keep calm, utilize your resources, pay attention to trendsetters, keep your finger to the pulse of the scene, never stop learning, and don’t give up — I can guarantee you’ll be a pro in no-time.

Now that we’ve gone over that — let’s make some stuff. To start, open these tabs:

Thanks for following along, I hope this was as much fun for you as it was for me! ♥